Winter 2019

  • Jan 02-31 Wed-Thu

    Vexed: The East L.A. Chicano Punk Scene Sal Guerena, UCSB Library Special Research Collections

    • The Brat EP
    10:00 AM

    Exhibit

    Art Exhibition / MCC Lounge

    Not long after the punk scene exploded in New York City in the mid-1970s, young Chicanas and Chicanos in the greater Eastside of Los Angeles began adopting the DIY (do it yourself) punk aesthetic. They expressed their anger, discontent, and feelings of marginalization through a frenzied musical style and biting social commentary.  Early Chicano punk bands,  or punkeros, embraced the punk rock energy and political edge to draw attention to historic and contemporary injustices. The photographs are drawn from the Chicano Punk Rock Collection in the Special Research Collection’s California Ethnic and Multicultural Archives.

     
  • Jan 22 Tue

    The Alif Series: In Conversation With The Dead Zulfikar Ali Bhutto //Faluda Islam\\

    • Zulfikar Ali Bhutto_ Fauda Islam photo by Robbie Sweeny
    7:30 PM

    Performance

    Performance / MCC Theater

    Zulfikar Ali Bhutto //Faluda Islam\\ is an artist, performer, zombie drag queen, and curator of mixed Pakistani, Lebanese, and Iranian descent. His work explores complex identities formed by centuries of colonialism and exacerbated by contemporary international politics. Bhutto unpacks the intersections of queerness and Islam and how it exists in a constant liminal and non-aligned space.  Faluda Islam is less a drag queen and more a drag comrade, she is more "extra" than terrestrial, and more dead than alive. She has traveled through time and space and been brought back to life through wifi technology from a gory encounter with American allied troops in Libya. As a time traveller and living corpse, she has many powers including being able to speak to the dead, as she herself comes back to life she will also resurrect, if only for a brief period, martyrs, comrades, allies, and family who she must engage in conversation with to understand her own struggle.

  • Jan 23 Wed

    Tested

    • Tested
    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    The racialized opportunity gap in America remains extreme. Nowhere is this more evident than our nation's top public schools. In New York City, where Blacks and Hispanics make up 70% of the city's school-aged population, they represent less than 5% at the city's most elite public high schools. Meanwhile, Asian Americans make up as much as 73%. This documentary, in an effort to prove that this gap is systematic, not individual, follows a dozen racially and socioeconomically diverse 8th graders as they fight for a seat at one of these schools. Their only way in: to ace a single standardized test. TESTED includes the voices of such education experts as Pedro Noguera and Diane Ravitch as it explores such issues as access to a high-quality public education, affirmative action, and the model-minority myth. Post film discussion with director, Curtis Chin. himself! 

  • Jan 24 Thu

    The Struggle to Abolish Environmental Racism Pam Tau Lee

    • Pam Tau Lee
    6:00 PM

    Race Matters Series

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    This talk will highlight the Asian radical imaginings of environmental justice from the homeland to the frontlines. Rooted in 50 years of Asian American radical activism and environmental justice organizing, Pam Tau Lee addresses the question: “Can an Asian radical perspective contribute toward achieving environmental justice?” Pam Tau Lee is a veteran Asian American organizer and activist.  She was involved in the San Francisco Asian American struggles of the 1960s-70s and helped found both the Chinese Progressive Association and the Asian Pacific Environmental Network. Pam has worked with some of the most important people in the environmental justice movement to insist that the movement focuses on environmental racism, Indigenous struggles, and include the voices and leadership of the most vulnerable. 

  • Jan 25 Fri

    Ismail Lumanovski and Inspector Gadje Balkan Brass

    • Ismail Lumanovski and Inspector Gadje Balkan Brass
    7:30 PM

    Music Performance

    Music Performance / MCC Theater

    Ismail Lumanovski (mastermind of New York Gypsy All-Stars) and Inspector Gadje released their debut album Live At Kafana Balkan in March 2017. There’s been a buzz from the start for this pairing, which consistently draws sold out crowds propelled by high energy, soaring, funky, dirty, ecstatic brass. The New York Times called Lumanovski a "brilliant, fearless young clarinetist, “ and the San Francisco Chronicle calls Gadje "an instant party atmosphere," so you can imagine the virtuosity and sway this dynamic project inspires. While Lumanovski and Inspector Gadje each stand tall as performers in their own right, together they have a certain synergy and magic that take their music to new heights. Tight and adventurous arrangements, grooves that get under the skin and into the feet, and epic solos come together for music that touches the heart, stirs the soul, and moves the body. $5 for UCSB students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission.

    Buy Tickets Here: https://events.ucsb.edu/event/ismail-lumanovski-and-inspector-gadje-balkan-brass/

  • Jan 28 Mon

    Brother, I’m Dying

    • Brother I
    6:00 PM

    Race and Literature Series

    Facilitator: Nadege Clitandre / 

    This year, the MultiCultural Center kicked off a new series to explore the issues of race and belonging through literature. This will be an interactive space for lively discussions on various theories about race, a safe space for articulating perspectives on identity and belonging which are contextualized by different authors, and an intentional time for centering the narratives of marginalized communities. Discussions will be facilitated by various faculty members, graduate students, and staff members. Readings may be suggested but are not required for attendance. This series hopes to cultivate open dialogue, and a spirit of appreciation and intellectual kinship. Dessert will be provided! All are welcome.

     
  • Jan 29 Tue

    Civic Imagination: Roadmaps, Stories, Research and Calls to Action Sangita Shresthova

    • Shresthova
    6:00 PM

    Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    Drawing on the work of the Civic Imagination Project at the University of Southern California, this interactive talk engages the imagination as a complex tool for civic action. Here, the civic imagination is defined as the capacity to imagine alternatives to current cultural, social, political, or economic conditions; one cannot change the world unless one can imagine what a better world might look like.This talk will offer a historical context and theoretical framework to situate our approach to the civic imagination. Sangita Shresthova, Ph.D., focuses on digital media, civics, participation, the civic imagination, and cross cultural dialogue. Her recent academic research has focused on storytelling and surveillance among American Muslim youth, the fallout from the Kony2012 campaign, and global Bollywood.

  • Jan 30 Wed

    Hailing Cesar

    • CoC-Hailing Cesar
    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    The grandson of civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, Eduardo Chavez, embarks on a journey to better understand his grandfather's legacy. Like his father and grandfather before him, he begins to work as a farm-worker, picking grapes in the field, and learns first hand the kind of labor that goes into putting fruits and vegetables on people’s plates. Through his reconnection with his family's legacy, we learn about Cesar Chavez's plight to create equality for farm-workers and use that knowledge to understand the current conditions that they face in the fields and back at home. Post-film discussion with director, Eduardo Chavez.

  • Jan 31 Thu

    An Evening of Poetry with Kavi Ade

    • Gold
    7:30 PM

    Spoken Word

    Spoken Word / MCC Theater

    Kavi Ade’s poetry is a lamentation, a leaning in to what haunts the spirit of a Black
    Trans Queer body. With poems that are deeply personal, while inescapably political,
    Ade’s work grapples with being set at the throne of violence. Using art as resistance, 
    they create transformative dialogue that aims to combat supremacist powers and
    heal communities that have been relegated to the margins of society. Through poetry, 
    Kavi will speak on race, gender, sexuality, and social justice, chronicling despair, grasping at hope, and exploring the ways a body can learn to survive. This event is co-sponsored by the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity and the Department of Women, Gender and Sexual Equality’s Women’s Center. 

     
  • Feb 01-28 Fri-Thu

    A "New Dawn of Freedom" and the Frederick Douglass Family Celeste Bernier

    • Celeste Bernier
    12:00 AM

    Art Exhibition

    Exhibit / MCC Lounge

    Working together and against a changing backdrop of US slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Frederick Douglass family fought for a new "dawn of freedom.” This exhibition displays the speeches, letters, autobiographies, essays, and photographs of Frederick Douglass and his daughters and sons, Rosetta, Lewis Henry, Frederick Jr., Charles Remond, and Annie Douglass. The Douglass family have much to teach us today as they lived with the scars of slavery and the wounds of war in their shared fight for all freedoms.  

  • Feb 06 Wed

    America to Me (Episodes 1 and 2)

    • America to Me
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    This unscripted documentary series presents an exclusive look into an academic year at suburban Chicago's Oak Park and River Forest High Schools. Students, teachers, and administrators from one of the country's highest performing and diverse public schools are profiled in the face of decades-old racial and educational inequities. The series delves into the experiences of the racially diverse student population, sparking conversations about what has and has not succeeded in the quest to achieve racial equity and overcome bias in education.

  • Feb 07 Thu

    ’Begin Again’: Fighting for Democracy in the Age of Trump

    • Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
    6:00 PM

    Race & Religion

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    The talk begins with a reflection on James Baldwin’s formulation in Just Above My Head. “Responsibility is not lost; it is abdicated. If one refuses abdication then one begins again.” Here the fight for democracy, in this moment with the erosion of norms and the fragility of democratic institutions, requires of us, in our specific places and in full light of the kind of society we want, a different kind of struggle and a more robust political language. Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor and chair of African American Studies at Princeton University. Whether he is teaching in the classroom, writing in popular magazines, or offering commentary on television, Glaude is driven by a commitment to think carefully with others in public.

  • Feb 08 Fri

    An Evening of Persian Music: Noor, The Path of Light The Lian Ensemble

    • Noor, The Path of Light The Lian Ensemble
    7:30 PM

    Music Performance

    Music Performance / MCC Theater

    Noor means light. Noor, The Path of Light,  will explore modern connections between two art forms with ancient ties through a powerful crossover between Persian music and a variety of genres including Tuvan, Indian, Jazz, Flamenco and Celtic music.The Lian Ensemble’s members, Houman Pourmehdi, Pirayeh Pourafar, Mani Bolouri, and  Alireza Shahmohammadi, are all passionate and skilled virtuoso performers and composers. Individually and collectively, through their masterful use of traditional Persian instruments, they creatively create a synthesis of mystical world music composed of traditional and folk melodies. Lian Ensemble has emerged as one of the leading groups in World Music today. The ensemble’s music flows effortlessly between a diverse range of styles and traditions, while fearlessly forging a path and sound that is all their own . $5 for UCSB students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission.

    Buy Tickets Here: https://events.ucsb.edu/event/an-evening-of-persian-music-noor-the-path-of-light/

     
  • Feb 12 Tue

    Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

    •  Jose Antonio Vargas
    6:00 PM

    Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

    Lecture / Campbell Hall

    Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and a leading voice for the human rights of immigrants. He is the founder and CEO of Define American, the nation’s leading non-profit media and culture organization that fights injustice and anti-immigrant hate through the power of storytelling. His memoir, Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, was published by HarperCollins in the fall of 2018. In this lecture, Vargas will take the audience deeper into his story, sharing details of his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his journey through America as an immigration reform activist; and his journey inward as he re-connects with his mother, whom he hadn’t seen in person in over 20 years. With anecdotes from both his personal experiences and the struggles of countless other undocumented immigrants in America, Vargas poignantly explores one of the most divisive questions facing our country today: how do you define “American”?

  • Feb 13 Wed

    PROFILED

    • Profiled
    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FIlm Screening / MCC Theater

    This powerful documentary knits the stories of mothers of Black and Latino youth murdered by the NYPD into a powerful indictment of racial profiling and police brutality. Some of the victims--Eric Garner, Michael Brown--are now familiar the world over. Others, like Shantel Davis and Kimani Gray, who are no less important but unfortunately swept up in a sea of names, are remembered mostly by family and friends in their New York neighborhoods. Ranging from the routine harassment of minority students in an affluent Brooklyn neighborhood to the killings and protests in Staten Island and Ferguson, Missouri, PROFILED bears witness to the racist violence that remains an everyday reality for Black and Latino people in this country.

  • Feb 19 Tue

    A "New Dawn of Freedom" and the Frederick Douglass Family Celeste Bernier

    • Image 1
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Opening Reception

    Exhibit / MCC Lounge

    Working together and against a changing backdrop of US slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Frederick Douglass family fought for a new "dawn of freedom.” This exhibition displays the speeches, letters, autobiographies, essays, and photographs of Frederick Douglass and his daughters and sons, Rosetta, Lewis Henry, Frederick Jr., Charles Remond, and Annie Douglass. The Douglass family have much to teach us today as they lived with the scars of slavery and the wounds of war in their shared fight for all freedoms.  

  • Feb 20 Wed

    BlacKkKlansman

    • Blackkklansman
    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    In the early 1970s, Ron Stallworth becomes the Colorado Springs police department’s first black police officer. When he spots an ad asking people to call the Ku Klux Klan for more information, he dials and reaches David Duke, the Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. He tells Duke he hates Blacks, Jews, Mexicans, Italians, Irish, and Chinese. Through his contact with Duke, Ron discovers that the Ku Klux Klan is planning an attack. He gets Flip Zimmerman, a white officer, to play him in order to meet face to face with Duke and his fellow Klan members. The  Klan allows no less than three undercover cops to join their den, as Stallworth and his fellow cops hilariously disprove all their delusions of white superiority.

  • Feb 21 Thu

    Confronting Institutional and Systemic Racism Chandan Reddy and Stephen Dillon

    • combined-portraits-web
    6:00 PM

    Diversity Lecture

    Panel Discussion / MCC Theater

    This panel aims to discuss in greater detail two main questions - what is institutionalized racism? and how do we navigate a system when we are still a part of it?. The goal is to give all affiliated with the university who have experienced institutionalized racism, either consciously or unconsciously, the tools to handle and combat it. Chandan Reddy is Associate Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies and the Program for the Comparative Study of Ideas at the University of Washington, Seattle. Stephen Dillon is an Assistant Professor of Critical Race and Queer Studies at Hampshire College in Massachusetts. The panel will be facilitated by Gaye Theresa Johnson, Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. 

  • Feb 25 Mon

    Bad Indians

    • Bad Indians
    6:00 PM

    Race and Literature Series

    Co-Facilitators: Margaret McMurtrey and Mia Lopez / 

    This year, the MultiCultural Center kicked off a new series to explore the issues of race and belonging through literature. This will be an interactive space for lively discussions on various theories about race, a safe space for articulating perspectives on identity and belonging which are contextualized by different authors, and an intentional time for centering the narratives of marginalized communities. Discussions will be facilitated by various faculty members, graduate students, and staff members. Readings may be suggested but are not required for attendance. This series hopes to cultivate open dialogue, and a spirit of appreciation and intellectual kinship. Dessert will be provided! All are welcome.

     
  • Feb 26 Tue

    Healing Through Restorative Justice Fania Davis

    • Fania Davis
    6:00 PM

    Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    A quickly emerging field which invites a fundamental shift in the way we think about and do justice, restorative justice is based on a desired set of principles and practices to mediate conflict, strengthen community, and repair harm. This talk will speak to the importance of restorative justice and how it can contribute to processes of individual and community healing. Fania Davis is co-founder and Director of Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth (RJOY) and a civil rights attorney with a Ph.D. in indigenous knowledge. A national thought leader in the field, Fania Davis is a long-time social justice activist, restorative justice practitioner, and professor. 

  • Feb 27 Wed

    Constructing the Terrorist Threat

    • Constructing a Terrorist Threat
    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    Deepa Kumar, one of the nation’s foremost scholars on Islamophobia, looks at how Muslims have become the predominant face of terror in U.S. news and entertainment media — even though terror attacks by white extremists have far outnumbered attacks by Muslim Americans since 9/11. Arguing that racialized threats have long been used to induce moral panics and advance anti-democratic policies, Kumar explores how ruling elites have been raising the specter of Arab and Islamic terror since the 1970s to justify militarism, war, and curbs on civil liberties. From the Iran-Hostage Crisis in 1979 to the “war on terror” after 9/11 to the rise of ISIS today, she argues that Americans have been taught to fear Muslims out of all proportion to reality, presenting a wealth of eye-opening data about the actual threat level posed by Muslim terrorists in the United States.

  • Feb 28 Thu

    An Evening of Self Expression with Fong Tran

    • Fong Tran
    7:30 PM

    MCC in IV

    Open Mic / Biko Garage 6612 Sueno Rd, Isla Vista

    The MCC hosts a quarterly open mic for anyone to artistically express themselves using all creative outlets including spoken word, poetry, music, and dance. All are welcome to attend and participate. The MCC is happy to welcome back Fong Tran, a spoken word poet, higher education professional, and youth development trainer, to act as this quarter’s MC. An enthusiastic orator whose master’s degree focuses on the experiences of youth of color in social media, Fong’s work has been featured by TEDx, Upworthy, Kollaboration, Angry Asian Man, California Council of Cultural Centers in Higher Education (CACCCHE) and Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA). 

  • Mar 02 Sat

    Doun-Doun-Ba! Music & Dance from Guinea with Fara Tolno & Leida Tolentino

    • Leida Tolentino
    11:00 AM

    Children’s Event

    Performance and Workshop / MCC Lounge

    Would you like to meet Mrs. Dundounba? How about Mr. Sangban and the little Kenkeni? Together they form a family of West African drums, and they sound just like their names. West African dance is power. It is freedom in rhythmic expression, and it is also deeply healing. Come learn how to play these and other instruments, as well as dance to their beats, no matter what your age is! This high-energy community class will be led by Leida Tolentino, who grew up in the Cape Verde Islands and is a passionate student and performer of West African and African diaspora dance styles since 2002, and Fara Tolno who was born in Guinea, West Africa and spent his youth in the village of Kissidugu and Guinea’s capital city, Conakry. Playing djembe since the age of nine, he has traveled extensively performing and teaching both drumming and dance. 

  • Mar 06 Wed

    Our People Will Be Healed

    • CoC-Our-People-Will-Be-Healed
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    Alanis Obomsawin’s 50th film reveals how a Cree community in Manitoba has been enriched through the power of education. The Helen Betty Osborne Ininiw Education Resource Centre in Norway House receives a level of funding that few other Indigenous institutions enjoy.  Its teachers help students to develop their abilities and sense of pride. This documentary conveys a message of hope: in an appropriate school environment, one that incorporates their people’s history, language, and culture, Indigenous youth can realize their dreams.