Fall 2010

  • Oct-Dec 06-10 Wed-Fri

    No Human Being is Illegal! Posters on the Myths and Realities of the Immigrant Experience

    • No Human Being is Illegal!
    10:00 AM - 10:00 PM

    Art Exhibit

    EXHIBITION / MCC LOUNGE

    Give me your tired, your poor; Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free . . . . The disparity between the eloquent promise of the Statue of Liberty and the recent attacks against immigrants is enormous and reasons for immigration to the United States vary broadly. Yet from the Irish and Chinese in the nineteenth century to the Mexicans and Middle Easterners of the twenty-first centuries, discrimination based on race, class, language, and culture has unfortunately been consistent. Whether the reason for migration is to escape war, seek asylum from persecution, or pursue better economic opportunities, leaving one’s family, friends, and home is never easy, and the posters in this exhibition present the human side of this wrenching experience. 

    Produced by the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Los Angeles, California.

  • Oct 06 Wed

    No Human Being is Illegal! Posters on the Myths and Realities of the Immigrant Experience

    • No Human Being is Illegal!
    5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Art Exhibit

    OPENING RECEPTION / MCC LOUNGE

    Give me your tired, your poor; Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free . . . . The disparity between the eloquent promise of the Statue of Liberty and the recent attacks against immigrants is enormous and reasons for immigration to the United States vary broadly. Yet from the Irish and Chinese in the nineteenth century to the Mexicans and Middle Easterners of the twenty-first centuries, discrimination based on race, class, language, and culture has unfortunately been consistent. Whether the reason for migration is to escape war, seek asylum from persecution, or pursue better economic opportunities, leaving one’s family, friends, and home is never easy, and the posters in this exhibition present the human side of this wrenching experience. 

    Produced by the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, Los Angeles, California.

  • Oct 06 Wed

    Little Manila; Filipinos in California’s Heartland

    • Little Manila; Filipinos in California’s Heartland
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture - Meet the Filmmaker - Pilipino American Heritage Month

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Filled with chop suey houses, gambling dens, and dance halls, Little Manila in Stockton was notoriously called, "Skid Row," but it was also the closest thing Filipinos had to a hometown and the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines in the 1930s. Stockton residents recruited to work in the asparagus fields faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill their dreams. 
    Discussion with the director Marissa Aroy following the screening. Co-sponsored by Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) Asian American Cultural Resource Center and Kapatirang Pilipino. Aroy, 26 min., English, 2008, USA.

  • Oct 07 Thu

    D'FaQTo Life - D’Lo

    • DLo
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    Using excerpts from D's different solo shows, D’Lo takes the audiences on a roller-coaster ride of emotions with stories executed through stand-up, spoken word/poetry, and theater. D'Lo explores topics relating to South Asia and transgender social justice from the perspective of being a child of immigrant parents, raised in hip hop culture while trying to negotiate how identifying as "queer" intersected with a passion to create political art. 
    Co-sponsored by the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity.

  • Oct 11 Mon

    'Everybody’s got a little light under the sun:' Black Luminosity and the Visual Culture of Surveillance Simone Browne

    • Simone Browne
    4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    LECTURE / MCC THEATER

    In this talk, Simone Browne, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, explores the historical presence of surveillance technologies of transatlantic slavery – slave patrols, fugitive notices, and lantern laws – to question how technologies of seeing, instituted through slavery, to track blackness as property, inform the contemporary surveillance of the racial body. This is done through an examination of the reality television program Mantracker and The Book of Negroes, the first large-scale public record of black presence in North America. 
    Co-sponsored by the Black Studies Department, the Center for Black Studies Research, and the Center for New Racial Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara.

  • Oct 12 Tue

    Arizona's SB 1070

    • Immigration Panel
    5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    PANEL DISCUSSION / MCC THEATER

    Signed into law by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer on April 23, 2010 and scheduled to go into effect on July 29, Arizona’s SB 1070 will make the failure to carry immigration documents a crime and give the police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally. This law has reignited the divisive battle over immigration reform nationally. This panel explores the broader context for understanding contemporary immigration rules, including federal law as well as state and local rules like the one recently approved in Arizona. Panelists will discuss the political history of these rules, their likely impact on race and ethnic relations, and their relationship to similar rules in American history that have also attempted to discourage the presence of "undesirable" others. Panelists include John Park, Associate Professor in the Department of Asian American Studies and Associate Dean in the College of Letters and Science at UCSB and Angélica Salas, Executive Director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA).

  • Oct 13 Wed

    Precious

    • Precious
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Precious, a film you may have seen, but have you de-constructed it? Filled with life struggles, oppressive systems, and perseverance, Precious sheds light on issues such as race, class, violence, and education. A discussion with the UCSB Women’s Center Rape Prevention Education Program will follow the screening. Co-sponsored by the Women’s Center. Lee Daniels, 109 min., English. 2009, USA.

  • Oct 16 Sat

    An Evening of Music from Zimbabwe with Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited

    • Zimbabwe with Thomas Mapfumo
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    In the 1970s, during Zimbabwe’s war of independence against their white Rhodesian rulers, Thomas Mapfumo, often called theLion of Zimbabwe, created the chimurenga (the Shona word for 'revolutionary struggle'). This unique style combines the Zezurumbira, a 22-pronged, wood and iron lamellophone used in ceremonies to summon the spirits of dead ancestors, with western instruments such as electric guitars, bass, and trap drums, and a political message full of innuendo and traditional proverbs. 
    Co-sponsored by the Mbanefo Foundation Fund of UCSB. Tickets $5 UCSB students/$15 general. Contact the A.S Ticket Office at 805-893-2064. Limited seating.

  • Oct 19 Tue

    Restorative Justice: What’s Race Got to Do with It? Fania E. Davis

    • Fania E. Davis
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Race Matters Series

    DISCUSSION / MCC THEATER

    In this discussion, Fania E. Davis, Director of Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth, will focus on the contemporary U.S. restorative justice movement and race. Are some of the historical roots of the restorative justice movement found in the civil rights movement or is it a thing apart? Why has so much been written about restorative justice yet virtually nothing having to do with race? Does this new – but ancient – paradigm of justice that privileges healing over punitive responses to wrongdoing have the potential to push back the “New Jim Crow” and render mass incarceration (particularly of African American males) obsolete? If not, why not? If so, how so, and what are the challenges and potential pitfalls? Co-sponsored by the Center for Black Studies Research, City at Peace, and the Department of Black Studies.

  • Oct 20 Wed

    AUTUMN GEM: A Documentary on Modern China's First Feminist

    • AUTUMN GEM
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture – Meet the Filmmaker

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Meet the "Chinese Joan of Arc," Qiu Jin (1875 - 1907), radical feminist and leader of a revolutionary army that attempted to overthrow the corrupt Qing Dynasty. Qiu Jin boldly challenged traditional gender roles and emerged as a national heroine who is celebrated in China today. Discussion with filmmakers Rae Chang and Adam Tow following the screening. Co-sponsored by the East Asia Center and PIRE-ECCI (The Partnership in International Research and Education in Electron Chemistry and Catalysis at Interfaces). Chang and Tow, 56 min., English and Chinese with English subtitles, 2009, USA.

  • Oct 21 Thu

    Boombox Orchestra

    • Boombox Orchestra
    8:30 PM - 9:30 PM

    MCC in I.V.

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / ISLA VISTA, LOCATION TBA

    Rooted in underground culture, Boombox Orchestra is a live Hip Hop band infused with frenetic funk and a rock'n roll attitude. Conversant in the idioms of hip hop, funk, rock, blues and reggae, the group creates a unique sonic experience.

  • Oct 23 Sat

    Tell Me a Story!: The Craft of Storytelling for All Ages Jopesh Velasco

    • Jopesh Velasco
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    WORKSHOP / MCC THEATER

    Learn the craft of storytelling in this entertaining and interactive workshop for children ages 7 and up. Using movement, music, and multicultural folktales from around the world, participants will learn how to bring stories to life in new and exciting ways.

  • Oct 25 Mon

    Is the "Post" in Post-Racial the "Blind" in Color-Blind? Ian Haney López

    • Ian Haney López
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Race Matters Series

    DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    Ian Haney López's current research examines the emergence and operation of colorblindness in U.S. constitutional law as a harbinger of a new racial ideology aimed at legitimating and preserving the racial status quo. Asking whether the “post” in post-racial is the “blind” in colorblind, Haney López will lead a conversation on current racial politics, in particular the liberal evasion of race. Ian F. Haney López is the John H. Boalt Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, where he teaches in the areas of race and constitutional law. He has previously taught at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, as well as at Yale and Harvard law schools. Haney López has published ground-breaking work in the study of the social and specifically legal construction of race in two books, White by Law: The Legal Construction of Race and Racism on Trial: The Chicano Fight for Justice.

  • Oct 27 Wed

    Blacking-Up: Hip-Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity

    • Hip-Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    This ambitious and hard-hitting documentary looks at the popularity of hip-hop among America’s white youth. It asks whether white identification is rooted in admiration and a desire to transcend race or if it is merely a new chapter in the long continuum of stereotyping, mimicry, and cultural appropriation. Does it reflect a new face of racial understanding in white America or does it reinforce an ugly history? Robert A. Clift, 57 min., English, 2010, USA.

  • Nov 01 Mon

    The "Down Low": Perceptions of Race and Sexuality Darnell J. Bradley

    • Perceptions of Race and Sexuality  Darnell J. Bradley
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Race Matters Series

    DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    By now everyone has heard about the "Down Low" phenomenon. "Down Low" is a term associated with men who have sex with other men, while maintaining heterosexual relationships with women. A number of books and movies have been produced around the activities of these men; however, they have only added to the confusion and misunderstanding of what the "Down Low" label actually means. In this forum, we will share ideas and research about why this term adds to the age old racist misconception of minority males as sexual deviants, and how if the term is allowed to gain more momentum it will severely weaken the fight against HIV/AIDS. Darnell J. Bradley, Ed.D. is an Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies at Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee, WI. Over the last 12 years Dr. Bradley has been involved in student affairs as an administrator in Greek Life, Leadership, Volunteerism, and Multicultural Education. His research revolves around the experiences of students of color, LGBT, and fraternity/sorority life. 
    Co-sponsored by the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity and the Women’s Center.

  • Nov 03 Wed

    Six Generations

    • Six Generations
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture - Meet the Filmmaker

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Going back six generations of Chumash women, this film tells the story of Ernestine De Soto, the daughter of the last speaker of the Chumash language, and of her ancestors. The Chumash Native Americans lived on the California coast from Malibu north to San Luis Obispo, CA. Discussion with Paul Goldsmith, filmmaker; Dr. John Johnson, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History; and Dr. Niki Sandoval, The Gevirtz Graduate School of Education following the screening. Co-sponsored by the American Indian Cultural Resource Center; American Indian Graduate Student Alliance; American Indian Students Association; American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Paul Goldsmith, 56 min., English, 2009, USA.

  • Nov 04 Thu

    Outrageous! Opening Night SB Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Film Festival

    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    The MCC is excited to present the first screening of the 19th Annual Santa Barbara Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Film Festival. The film shorts presented on this night will feature the latest and greatest in film by and for queer communities throughout the United States.

  • Nov 05 Fri

    An Evening of Traditional Korean Music and Dance with the Korean Classical Music and Dance Company

    • Korean Classical Music and Dance Company
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    From the thundering rhythms of the Buk chum (drum dance) to the graceful motion of the court dance and theBuchaechum (fan dance) folk dance, this ensemble brings the intriguing, beautiful dance and music of Korea to those who want to learn more about the cultures and forms of this fascinating country. Founded in 1973 under the artistic direction of UCLA professor Dr. Dongsuk Kim, this Southern California company is the only one of its kind in the USA and is internationally recognized for the authenticity and purity of its style. 
    Tickets $5 UCSB students/$15 general. Contact the A.S Ticket Office at 805-893-2064. Limited seating

  • Nov 08 Mon

    The Hijabi Monologues May Alhassen

    • The Hijabi Monologues May Alhassen
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    The Hijabi Monologues is about the power of storytelling. It is about creating a space for American Muslim women to share experiences; a space to breathe as they are; a space that does not claim to tell every story and speak for every voice. Through sharing stories, strangers touch and connect. Through stories, we are challenged. Through stories, we are humanized. 
    Co-sponsored by the A.S. Womyn’s Commission, the Muslim Student Association, and Students for Justice in Palestine.

  • Nov 09 Tue

    The Chicana/o Underground

    • The Chicana/o Underground
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Student Series

    PANEL DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    Highlighting the current research of doctoral students in the department of Chicana and Chicano studies, this panel will explore the role of music, race, and gender in the Chicana/o Underground. José Anguiano will present his findings from interviews with Chicano fans of the band The Smiths and their leader Morrissey. Carisa Cortez will talk about Chicana feminism, tattooing, and Chicana identity. Nicholas Centino will refer to race and Chicano/Latino Rockabilly.

  • Nov 10 Wed

    Our Summer in Tehran

    • Our Summer in Tehran
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    Cup of Culture - Meet the Filmmaker

    FILM SCREENING / CAMPBELL HALL

     Note change of Location and time 

    Our Summer in Tehran transports us into the seldom seen realm of middle class family life in Iran transcending overt politics in favor of subtle, human, and often humorous moments. Discussion with the filmmaker following the screening. Presented with Arts & Lectures. Justine Shapiro, 59 min., English and Persian with English subtitles, 2007, USA. Tickets $5 students, $6 general. Call the A&L ticket office at 805-893-3535.

  • Nov 13 Sat

    An Evening of Rockabilly with PACHUCO JOSÉ Y LOS DIAMANTES

    • PACHUCO JOSÉ Y LOS DIAMANTES
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    Feet stomping, hands clapping, and hips shaking, Pachuco José Y Los Diamantes will bring the Beat to your feet and the Jolt in your step with their Blend of "Pachuco Boogie." Do not miss this exciting Night of PACHUCO style and "Relajo." Tickets $5 UCSB students/$15 general. Contact the A.S Ticket Office at 805-893-2064. Limited seating.

  • Nov 16 Tue

    Melting Pot or Tossed Salad? Defining Race Relations in America: A Discussion for International Students

    5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    PANEL DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    Every year, hundreds of international students from around the world arrive at UCSB and other universities in the country to pursue their dream of higher education in America. They bring with them perceptions of the diversity of the US, acquired through American TV, movies, and the Internet. Once in this country, do these ideas hold true? How do race relations in America compare to those at home? This panel will give an overview of the history and challenges faced in trying to realize the value of human rights for all and answer questions on some of the issues and trends of race relations in America. 
    Co-sponsored by the Office of International Students and Scholars.

  • Nov 17 Wed

    Writing in the Time of Mexiphobia, or Packing Your Papers: Readings from Unpublished Essays in Writing in My Pajamas. Sandra Cisneros

    • Sandra Cisneros
    7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Diversity Lecture

    LECTURE / CAMPBELL HALL

    Sandra Cisneros is the founder of the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation, the Elvira Cisneros Award and the Macondo Foundation, all of which work on behalf of creative writers. She is the recipient of numerous awards including a MacArthur. Her writings include The House on Mango Street and Caramelo; short stories as Woman Hollering Creek; and the poetry collections My Wicked Wicked Ways and Loose Woman. She makes her home in San Antonio, Texas, where she is writer in residence at Our Lady of the Lake University. Co-sponsored by the Center for New Racial Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara; the Chicano Studies Institute; the College of Creative Studies; the Comparative Literature Program; the departments of Chicana and Chicano Studies; English; Feminist Studies; Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies; Linguistics; and Spanish and Portuguese; Latin American and Iberian Studies; the Luis Leal Endowed Chair in Chicano Studies; the MultiCultural Center; the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Academic Policy; the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor; the Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment/Title IX Compliance; and the Writing Program.

  • Nov 18 Thu

    Open Mic

    • Open Mic
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    OPEN MIC / MCC THEATER

    Whether you’ve got some art to share, a song to sing, poetry or a performance reflecting your identity, you are invited to this open forum for self-expression. Anyone and everyone are welcome to grace the stage in a supportive space.