Winter 2010

  • Jan 12 Tue

    From the Roots: The Flowering of El Teatro Campesino Luis Valdez

    • Luis Valdez
    4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

    Diversity Lecture

    LECTURE  / MCC THEATER

    Through his storytelling, within its matrix of aesthetic and political concepts, Luis Valdez delineates the evolution of the Farm Workers Theater of America. From his earliest experiences as a migrant worker to his years with Cesar Chavez as a picket captain in the Delano Grape Strike, where he organized El Teatro Campesino, Valdez explores the historical imperative behind his work as a playwright, director, and creator of Chicano theater and film. Co-sponsored by the California Ethnic and Multicultural Archives at the Davidson Libraries; the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Academic Policy; the Office of Equal Opportunity & Sexual Harassment/Title IX Compliance, the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor, and the Multicultural Center.

  • Jan 13 Wed

    Lemon Tree

    • Lemon Tree
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Salma, a Palestinian widow, stands up against her new neighbor, the Israeli Defense Minister, when he moves into his new house opposite her lemon grove, on the green line border between Israel and the West Bank. Israeli Defense Forces state the grove is a threat to the Minister’s safety and try to uproot them. Eran Riklis, 106 min, Arabic, Hebrew, English, and French, 2008, Israel, Germany, France. Co-sponsored by the Israeli Palestinian Film Festival.

  • Jan-Mar 14-12 Thu-Fri

    Realidad Separada by Álvaro Ángeles Suman

    • Realidad Separada by Álvaro Ángeles Suman
    8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

    Art Exhibit

    ART EXHIBIT / MCC LOUNGE

    Painter, sculptor, and ceramicist Álvaro Ángeles Suman recreates Mexican cultural icons in a contemporary style. This use of traditional Mexican motifs gives his work a characteristic tone, generally associated with the work of well-known artist José Guadalupe Posada, or with the artistic tendencies explored by Mexican muralists. Suman has exhibited his work in Mexico, the United States, and Spain. Co-sponsored by the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and the Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Academic Policy.

  • Jan 20 Wed

    Which Way Home

    • Which Way Home
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Each year, thousands of Latin American migrants travel hundreds of miles to the United States, with many making their way on the tops of freight trains. Roughly five percent of those traveling alone are children. As the United States continues to debate immigration reform, this documentary looks at the issue through the eyes of children who face the harrowing journey with enormous courage and resourcefulness. Rebecca Cammisa, 90 min., English and Spanish, 2009, USA. Co-sponsored by UCSB Library-UCSB Reads Program and the Women’s Center.

  • Jan 21 Thu

    Open Mic

    • Open_Mic_2
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    Open Mic

    OPEN MIC / MCC THEATER

    Whether you’ve got some art to share, a song to sing, poetry or a performance reflecting your identity, you are invited to this open forum for self-expression. Anyone and everyone are welcome to grace the stage in a supportive space.

  • Jan 23 Sat

    Mime Oscar Ortiz

    • Mime Oscar Ortiz
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Children’s Event

    PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATRE

    Experience the magic of illusion and inventive comedy of Mexico-based mime Oscar Ortiz as he captivates both children and adults with his lively sketches. Ortiz is a former actor with Los Zopilotes of San Luis Potosi and a lecturer at the University of Quintana Roo in Chetumal, Mexico. Co-sponsored by the Department of Theater and Dance, the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and the Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Academic Policy, and the Women’s Center.

  • Jan 27 Wed

    Walk on Water

    • Walk on Water
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Eyal, an Israeli Mossad agent, is given the mission to track down and kill the very old Alfred Himmelman, an ex-Nazi officer, who might still be alive. Pretending to be a tourist guide, he befriends his grandson Axel, in Israel to visit his sister Pia. The two men set out on a tour of the country during which Axel challenges Eyal's values. Eytan Fox, 103 min., English, Hebrew, and German, 2004, Israel. Co-sponsored by the Israeli Palestinian Film Festival.

  • Jan 28 Thu

    Christine Corpuz

    • Christine Corpuz
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    I Am Nothing Like My Mother

    PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    This one-woman show explores the contradictions we face each day and the means by which we choose to accept or deny, and laugh or cry, through their existence. Written and performed by UCSB alumna Christine Corpuz, MOTHER originally debuted at New York University's Graduate Acting Freeplay Festival in 2007. It was later produced by New York City's Nuyorican Poet's Café in 2008, being the first Asian-American one-person show by the company, and earning Corpuz an Audelco/Vivian Robinson Award nomination in Best Solo Performance.

  • Jan 29 Fri

    An Evening of Gypsy Music with the Fishtank Ensemble

    • Fishtank Ensemble
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    The LA Weekly calls them "cross pollinated gypsy music….one of the most thrilling young acts on the planet." Formed in 2005 and playing everywhere from the hippest LA clubs to festivals, and even on the street, the band includes two explosive violins, the best slap bass player in the world, musical saw, flamenco and gypsy jazz guitar, trombone, opera, jazz and gypsy vocals, accordion and one little banjolele. Tickets $5 students / $15 general. Contact the A.S. Ticket Office at 805-893-2064.

  • Feb 01 Mon

    Racism without Racists: Contemporary Racial Discrimination in the Age of Obama's "Post-Racial" America Phil Goff

    • Phil Goff
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Race Matters Series

    DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    If the United States has made such great strides in reducing racial prejudice, then how does one explain persistent racial disparities? Common social science wisdom explains this disconnect by insisting that racial prejudice has merely "gone underground," that prejudice is still responsible for inequality but is now more subtly expressed. However, given the historically tenuous link between attitudes and behaviors more generally, is it possible that racial discrimination may exist absent racial hostility? Could there be racism without racists? Phil Goff, professor of Social Psychology at UCLA, suggests that there can be, and that developing a language to describe it may be essential to combating it.

  • Feb 02 Tue

    I am not a Terrorist

    5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    PANEL DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    The terrorist attacks of 9/11 resulted in a growing public suspicion and mistrust toward Muslims and Islam. Since then, Middle Easterners are stopped and searched every time they fly, women wearing head scarves have become a target, hate crimes against Muslims have spiked, and Switzerland recently had "the minaret moment" by passing a referendum to ban the nation's Muslims from building minarets. Kathleen Moore, Professor in Religious Studies at UC Santa Barbara; Edina Lekovic, Communications Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council; and Giselle García, UCSB undergraduate in Middle East Studies, among others, will address topics such as racism and discrimination against these communities, racial profiling, and civil rights.

  • Feb 03 Wed

    Say My Name

    • Say My Name
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    In a hip hop and R’n’B world dominated by men and noted for misogyny, the unstoppable female lyricists of Say My Name speak candidly about class, race, and gender in pursuing their passions as female emcees. Nirit Peled, 75 min., English, 2009, UK/USA. Co-sponsored by the Black Student Union and the Women’s Center.

  • Feb 05 Fri

    An Evening of Jazz with Sacred Urban Echoes

    • An Evening of Jazz with Sacred Urban Echoes
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    Iconic figures from the Los Angeles art scene, critically acclaimed vocalist Dwight Trible and award winning performance poet Kamau Daaood present an evening of socially conscious, spirited music and poetry spanning a spectrum from world music, spiritual jazz, to the avant-garde; all rooted deeply in African-American traditions. Celebrating their work together of over twenty years, Daaood and Trible will be supported by some of Los Angeles finest musicians and by members of the UCSB Black Student Union for a truly uplifting, inspiring, and thought provoking evening. Co-sponsored by the Black Student Union and Black Studies. Tickets $5 students / $15 general. Contact the A.S. Ticket Office at 805-893-2064.

  • Feb 10 Wed

    Still Black: A Portrait of Black Transmen

    • Still Black
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Student Series

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Still Black: A Portrait of Black Transmen is brought to life by the stories of six thoughtful, eloquent, and diverse transmen. Preachers, teachers, students, and activists educate us simply by making their presence known. Discussion with members of the Black Student Union following the screening. Kortney Ryan Ziegler, 78 min., English, 2008, USA. Co-sponsored by the Black Student Union and the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity.

  • Feb 11 Thu

    La Maricolectiva

    • La Maricolectiva
    7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

    Student Series

    PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    In a mix of spoken word, slam poetry, cabaret and stand up, spanish, english y espanglish with a kick of jotaslang, la Jotísima trinidad de la Maricolectiva reclaims the jota/o experience and seeks to "build a stage on top of the world" para las colored jotitas who speak softly y fiercely. The work of la Yosi, la Neza y la Xuanis started out of the necessity for queer Latino gender non-conforming immigrant voices across the southwest to be heard. This collective of jotas aims at giving priority to those voices that come from displacement, documenting the undocumented and creating a homeland using palabra, teatro, drag y jotería. Co-sponsored by De Colores and the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity.

  • Feb 16 Tue

    Zombie Orientals Ate My Brain: Anti-Arab & Anti-Asian Themes in Zombie Film & Fiction Eric Hamako

    • Zombie Film & Fiction  Eric Hamako
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Race Matters Series

    DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    Since 2001, zombies have become more popular than ever. Why? Zombies tap into historical narratives about Arabs, Muslims, and East Asians. Symbolizing the racial and socioeconomic “Other," zombies are infused with Orientalist qualities such as an insatiable yet asexual hunger for the flesh, unintelligibility, implacability, and a horde-like social structure that threatens to pollute heteronormative White family structures and racial purity. But, some zombie stories play with and resist these Orientalist ideas -- and so can we.

  • Feb 17 Wed

    Our Spirits Don't Speak English: Indian Boarding School

    • Indian Boarding School
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    A Native American perspective on Indian Boarding Schools, this film uncovers the dark history of U.S. Government policy which took Indian children from their homes, forced them into boarding schools, and enacted a policy of educating them in the ways of Western Society. It gives a voice to the countless Indian children forced through a system designed to strip them of their Native American culture, heritage and traditions. Chip Richie, 80 min., 2008, English, USA. Co-sponsored by the American Indian Cultural Resource Center, the American Indian Graduate Student Alliance, the American Indian Science and Engineering Society, and the American Indian Student Association.

  • Feb 18 Thu

    Learning from the Grassroots: Radical Pedagogies and Indigenous Autonomy from the Global South Gustavo Esteva

    5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Student Series

    LECTURE / MCC THEATER

    Mexican intellectual Gustavo Esteva examines how the transnational and trans-local Indigenous Autonomous movement has been a critical inspiration to the alter-globalization movement currently confronting the excesses of Globalization and US military adventurism, as well as the boutique and corporate multiculturalism strategies that dominate the diversity debate in the US. Esteva is a key proponent of horizontal, convivial learning spaces and one of the primary coordinators of two key popular education projects, the Center for Encounters and Intercultural Dialogues and Universidad de La Tierra, Oaxaca. Co-sponsored by El Congreso.

  • Feb 19 Fri

    América Te Hablo de Ernesto (America, I Tell you about Ernesto) An Evening of Latin American Poetry and Songs from the 60s, 70s and 80s MusicaLatitudes

    • América Te Hablo de Ernesto
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    MCC Sold Out

    With the purpose to celebrate peace, love, and social justice, MusicaLatitudes came together to perform contentious Latin American poetry and songs from the 60s, 70s, and 80s in memory of the 80th birthday of Ernesto "Che" Guevara, a man who represents the failed Latin American revolutionary movement of the 60s. The poetry, selected from the recently found and published Che Guevara's Green Notebook, celebrates his bequest and human sensibility, the same one that today guides the new awakening of Latin America in its search for its definitive socio-political and cultural independence. In Spanish and English..Tickets $5 students / $15 general. Contact the A.S. Ticket Office at 805-893-2064. Co-sponsored by the Unión Salvadoreña de Estudiantes Universitarios.

  • Feb 23 Tue

    Poverty and Social Hierarchy in Chinese America Xiaojian Zhao

    • Chinese America
    5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    READING / MCC LOUNGE

    In her recently published book The New Chinese America: Class, Economy, and Social Hierarchy, Professor Xiaojian Zhao explores the historical, economic, and social foundations of Chinese America, revealing the emergence of a social hierarchy within the ethnic community after 1965. Using class analysis, she shows that while many Chinese in the United States have achieved middle class social status, they have also become more dependent on the availability of poorer, less affluent, and more vulnerable new (often undocumented) immigrants. Xiaojian Zhao is an associate professor in the Department of Asian American Studies at UCSB. Co-sponsored by Asian American Studies.

  • Feb 24 Wed

    Traces of Trade: A Story from the Deep South

    • Traces of Trade: A Story from the Deep South
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    In this feature documentary, filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. She and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade and gain a powerful new perspective on the black/white divide. Discussion with Professor Wade Roof and Dr. Gloria Willingham following the screening. Katrina Browne, 86 min., English, 2008, USA. Co-sponsored by the Santa Barbara African Heritage Film Series and the Walter H. Capss Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion and Public Life.

  • Feb 25 Thu

    Dead Prez

    • Dead Prez
    8:30 PM - 9:30 PM

    PERFORMANCE / UCEN HUB

    Continuing on the path of politically minded artists like Public Enemy, 2pac, and KRS-One, Dead Prez has been revolutionizing hip-hop since the late 1990s. Taking inspiration from the life and social activism of Malcolm X, Sticman and M-1 produce political hip-hop that challenges the status quo to rally against the inequities in American society. With insight and honesty, they rep the streets and give voice to the hearts and minds of those without mainstream representation. Tickets $5 students / $10 general. Contact the A.S. Ticket Office at 805-893-2064. Co-sponsored by A.S. Program Board and KCSB.

  • Feb 27 Sat

    An Evening of Argentine Tango Music and Dance

    • Argentine Tango Music and Dance
    8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    MUSIC PERFORMANCE / MCC THEATER

    A magical, intimate evening of Argentine Tango music and dance with San Francisco-based performers Seth Asarnow (bandoneón), Marcelo Puig (guitar), Chelsea Eng (dancer) & Count Glover (dancer). The richness of this ever-evolving art form will enchant you! Savor the unique, soulful qualities of the bandoneón, tango's key instrument, across playful milongas, sweet valses and dramatic tangos.
    Tickets $5 students / $15 general. Contact the A.S. Ticket Office at 805-893-2064.

  • Mar 01 Mon

    Using Critical Race Theory and Racial Microaggressions to Examine Everyday Racism Daniel Solorzano

    • Examine Everyday Racism Daniel Solorzano
    6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    Race Matters Series

    DISCUSSION / MCC LOUNGE

    In this discussion, Daniel Solorzano, professor of Social Sciences and Comparative Education at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, will focus on racial microaggressions, those covert or everyday forms of systemic racism used to keep those at the racial margins in their place. In order to comprehend racial microaggressions, we must first understand the different types of racial microaggressions that People of Color experience; the various contexts in which they occur; their effects on People of Color; and how People of Color respond to them.

  • Mar 03 Wed

    Meet the Filmmaker Rhythmic Uprising

    • Rhythmic Uprising
    6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    FILM SCREENING / MCC THEATER

    Rhythmic Uprising is a documentary that shows how the transformative powers of Afro-Brazilian performing arts are used to fight racism and inequality in Bahia, Brazil. This film takes a look behind the scenes of those grandiose carnival spectacles to see how local cultural leaders utilize these arts to change lives.
    Benjamin Watkins, 110 min., English, 2008, Brazil/USA. Discussion with the director following the screening.