Fall 2018

  • Sep 24 Mon

    An Evening of Chilean Alternative Pop: María Del Pilar Welcome Back Concert

    8:00 PM

    Music Performance / San Miguel Stage

    Maria Del PilarBorn in Chile and raised in Los Angeles, Maria Del Pilar has a characteristic tendency toward honesty in her music, as well as a fearlessness of crossing genre-borders, which has rightly established her as one of the most prominent figures in the Los Angeles and Latin Alternative scenes. After her first solo album Songs + Canciones I was released in 2015, she received critical acclaim from the likes of CNN, NPR, Mic., PRI, among many others, and has even been referred to as the Latina Bjork. Pilar has performed alongside acts like Chicano Batman, Tegan & Sara, and Tuneyards, has made audiences all over the globe swoon, and has had songs placed in some of your favorite shows (the latest being Vida on Starz). Pilar's new album, out November 2, carries a torch that she lit a decade ago- infectious, unabashed, and bilingual, Maria Del Pilar's music sings to struggles that are often difficult to put words to, and all while hitting just the right notes to keep you on the dance floor just a little longer.  


     

  • Oct 09 Tue

    Sacred Resistance: Spiritual Groundings for Reflection and Action Rev. Nancy Frausto

    6:00 PM

    Race and Religion

    Discussion / MCC Lounge

    Nancy-FraustoThe Rev. Nancy Frausto, Episcopal Priest and DACA beneficiary, will lead a discussion on issues of institutionalized racism, current immigration policies, and how, as a religious leader, her faith calls her to step into the front lines of political battles to advocate for the dignity of those who are oppressed. The discussion will be moderated by Charlie R. Hale, the SAGE Sara Miller McCune Dean of Social Sciences.

     

  • Oct 10 Wed

    More Than A Word

    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    More-Than-a-Word

    More Than A Word analyzes the Washington football team and their use of the derogatory term R*dskins. Using interviews from both those in favor of changing the name and those against, More Than A Word presents a deeper analysis of the many issues surrounding the Washington team name. The documentary also examines the history of Native American cultural appropriation. 1h 10m.

  • Oct 11 Thu

    MCC Open House

    6:00 PM

    Open House / MCC

    MCC_OpenHouse

    Join us at the MultiCultural Center to kick off another school year and learn about what we have to offer and our Fall events. Free food and entertainment will be provided. Bring a friend or two!

     
  • Oct 12 Fri

    Tradition and Transcendence: Music and Dance of Ethiopian Band, Fendika

    7:30 PM

    Music Performance / MCC Theater

    Fendika 2018 USA (1)

    Based in Addis Ababa, this seven-member group led by virtuoso dancer, Melaku Belay, re-imagines traditional Ethiopian culture for the 21st century. By combining tribal dances and indigenous instruments with elements of jazz, rock, and theater, Fendika is revitalizing the musical art form of Azmari and other Ethiopian traditions. With lively singing in Amharic, Ethiopian instruments such as the masinqo and krar, and ethnically diverse dance traditions from the Amhara, Oromo, Tigray, and Welayta.

    This band will make you dance the night away. $5 for UCSB Students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission.

    Purchase tickets here: http://goo.gl/HzAVDp

  • Oct 16 Tue

    An Evening of Poetry with Chrysanthemum Tran

    7:30 PM

    MCC Spoken Word

    Spoken Word / MCC Lounge

    Chrysanthemum Tran

    Chrysanthemum Tran is a queer & trans Vietnamese-American poet, performer, and educator. Having first made history in 2016 as the first transfeminine finalist of the Women of the World Poetry Slam, she is currently the highest ranked trans woman slam poet in the world. Chrysanthemum's writing has been featured in Them., The Offing, Bettering American Poetry Anthology, among others. Her work explores the continuing legacies of the Vietnam War, histories of queer policing and visibility, and her experiences as a trans woman of color surviving today.

  • Oct 17 Wed

    White Right: Meeting the Enemy

    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    White Right: Meeting the Enemy

    Three decades on and we are still waiting for tomorrow to fix today. With a US president propagating anti-Muslim propaganda, the far-right gaining ground in German elections, hate crimes on the rise in the UK, and divisive populist rhetoric infecting political and public discourse across western democracies, Deeyah Khan, daughter of  Pakistani immigrants, asks why. And to do so, she first addresses who. Joining the front lines of the very people who call for her elimination from society, Deeyah comes face to face with fascists, racists, and proponents of the alt-right. She joins their cause in an effort to understand, and finds herself in the midst of a war, both in the country she has come to call home and within her own beliefs. 60 m.

     
  • Oct 18 Thu

    Facing the Elephant in the Room: Getting Comfortable with Communicating about Race Cindu Thomas-George

    6:00 PM

    Race Matters Series

    Workshop / MCC Lounge

    Cindu Thomas-George

    The reality is that many people feel uncomfortable and under-prepared to talk about issues of race.his interactive workshop will encourage us to face the elephant in the room and learn to feel a bit more comfortable in our uncomfortability. This experiential workshop will expose participants to skills and knowledge that can guide them in working toward creating an equitable and inclusive campus culture that values racial justice and strengthening interethnic/racial relationships on and off  our campuses. Cindu Thomas-George, M.A., is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at College of Lake County in Grayslake, Illinois. She is also the Founder of Shakti Communication and Diversity Training.

  • Oct 19 Fri

    Psychedelic Cumbia Punk with Tropa Magica

    7:30 PM

    Music Performance / MCC Theater

    TropaM agica

    After receiving their blessing from Los Tigres Del Norte, East L.A. badasses, Thee Commons, metamorphosed into new stage outfit Tropa Magica. Still consisting of the chunster Pacheco brothers and their signature psychedelic cumbia punk, Tropa Magica boasts a “troop” of new “magical” sounds, now having added a second guitar to their repertoire. Tropa Magica has released monthly singles this year into the summer and their debut LP is dropping in the fall. From there, the tropical sky is the limit. $5 for UCSB Students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission.

    Purchase tickets here: https://goo.gl/JjeD7G

     
  • Oct 24 Wed

    Strong Island

    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    Strong-Island

    William Ford Jr.’s family is left restless as the murderer of their 24-year old son is allowed to walk free. William Ford Sr. suffers a stroke two years after the death of his son, Barbara Ford finds herself incapacitated with health issues, and Yance, William Ford Jr.’s brother, is left to pick up the pieces.

    Judged by an all-white jury, Mark Reilly, a 19-year old mechanic, claimed he acted in self-defense against Ford in an altercation at the Auto Shop, where Reilly was employed, but Yance believes it runs deeper and along racial lines. In a film Yance created himself to find the truth, examine the consequences, and honor his brother’s memory, Strong Island promises to expose, empathize, and force audiences to consider what they thought they knew to be true. 1h 47m.
  • Oct 25 Thu

    Teaching in/from Freedom: Supporting Undocumented Students in Times of Terror Lorgia García-Peña

    6:00 PM

    Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    Lorgia-García-Peña

    These times of terror and repression have brought forth new challenges for teaching, particularly for those teaching in fields that intersect with race and immigration.  How do we teach for/in freedom? How do we create spaces that protect our most vulnerable students while allowing for critical engagement and interventions? Sharing lessons from her work with Freedom University, Dr. García-Peña hopes to pose some practical questions for the future of our teaching and our learning that can contrast the climate of terror and fear lived in our country (and the world). Dr. Lorgia Garcia-Peña is Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of History and Literature at Harvard University. In 2003, she co-founded Freedom University, a “modern day freedom school” in Atlanta that provides tuition-free education, college application and scholarship assistance, and social movement leadership training to undocumented students banned from public higher education by Georgia state laws.

     
  • Oct 27 Sat

    Let's Play Marimba! Masanga Marimba Ensemble

    11:00 AM

    Children’s Event

    Performance and Workshop / Music Bowl

    Play-Marimba

    Masanga Marimba performs music from Africa, Latin America, and the U.S. on an ensemble of marimbas (xylophones) of various sizes that is traditional to the country of Zimbabwe. They will share songs, games, stories, dances, and everyone in the audience will have the chance to learn a song on the marimbas and perform a solo.

     
  • Oct 30-31 Tue-Wed

    Race and Literature

    6:00 PM

    Discussion / MCC Meeting Room

    This year, the MultiCultural Center is kicking off a new series to explore the issues of race and belonging through literature. This will be an interactive space for lively discussions on various theories about race, a safe space for articulating perspectives on identity and belonging which are contextualized by different authors, and an intentional time for centering the narratives of marginalized communities. Discussions will be facilitated by various faculty members, graduate students, and staff members. Readings may be suggested but are not required for attendance. This series hopes to cultivate open dialogue, and a spirit of appreciation and intellectual kinship. Dessert will be provided! All are welcome. Please contact the MCC if you’re interested in leading the conversation.

     
  • Oct 31 Wed

    A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

    In the Iranian ghost-town, Bad City, a place that reeks of death and loneliness, the townspeople are unaware they are being stalked by a lonesome vampire. 1h 47m.

     
  • Nov 06 Tue

    One Woman Show: Radical Time Travel and Other Acts of Resistance Denise Uyehara

    7:30 PM

    Performance / MCC Theater

    Denise_Uyehara

    Award-winning performance artist, writer, and director, Denise Uyehara, asks difficult questions through solo and collaborative projects: If Columbus were assassinated, how would life today be different? What does life look like for an undocumented worker in Tucson? How do we begin to break the cycle of injustice happening over and over again? Through action, ritual, text, and video, Uyehara explores these questions, providing layered and complicated responses instead of outright answers, challenging us to look deeper in these troubling times.

     
  • Nov 07 Wed

    Sorry to Bother You

    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    Culture-SorryToBotherYou-w

    “An outrageous and uncompromising assault on capitalism, consumerism, racism and other unpleasant -isms that have come to define these United States of America” - Creative Loafing. Sorry to Bother You features Cassius Green, a young black man in modern-day Oakland trying to surpass his current living and financial situation. Brought in to the world of telemarketing, Cassius finds that, to succeed, being himself isn’t enough. In a blockbuster film that is sure to turn heads, audience members are taken on a journey between what is “right” and “wrong” as Cassius’ budding success makes him choose between the money and the social activism that accepts him for who he is. A discussion will follow the film screening. 1h 51 m.

     
  • Nov 08 Thu

    Race, Rights and Resources: Bringing “Home” Three Decades of Activist Research in Latin America Charlie Hale

    6:00 PM

    Diversity Lecture

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    Charlie R. HaleCharlie R. Hale is an acclaimed anthropologist and the new SAGE Sara Miller McCune Dean of Social Sciences at UCSB. In 1977, he began what would become four decades of research and practical work with people seeking to better their lives through economic, political, and cultural empowerment, first in Bolivia (77-81), then Nicaragua (81-90), Guatemala (94-2002), Honduras (2003-04), and Southern Mexico (2008-2017). This talk reflects on the unlikely transition from those commitments to an administrative position at UC Santa Barbara, emphasizing how insights gleaned through activist research in seemingly faraway places might offer pathways and principles for engaging major challenges of intersectional justice and democratic efficacy at home—in higher education, and by extension, in society at large in our troubled times.

  • Nov 14 Wed

    Lives Still in Limbo: UnDACAmented and Navigating Uncertain Futures Roberto G. Gonzales

    4:00 PM

    Race Matters

    Lecture / MCC Theater

    Gonzales Photo

    Due to the political gridlock in the U.S. Congress, the fate of more than two million young immigrants remains uncertain. In 2012, President Obama introduced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and at the five year mark, more than 800,000 young people had benefited from the legislation. Things quickly changed under the Trump administration when U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced an end to this policy. What does this termination mean for these young people and their families’ futures? And what is the role of communities in this new policy’s wake? Based on a six year study, involving interviews with 481 young people in six states, Professor Gonzales provides some interesting answers to these vexing questions. Roberto G. Gonzales is Professor of Education at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education.

     
  • Nov 15 Thu

    When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir Patrisse Cullors

    6:00 PM

    Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

    Lecture / Corwin Pavilion

    Patrisse Cullors

    Artist, organizer, educator, and popular public speaker, Patrisse Cullors is a Los Angeles native and Co-Founder of the Black Lives Matter Global Network and Founder of grassroots Los Angeles based organization, Dignity and Power Now. She is also a senior fellow at MomsRising where she is working on ending Maternal Mortality and Morbidity. In 2013, Patrisse co-founded #BlackLivesMatter, the global movement with a viral Twitter hashtag, which has since grown to an international organization with dozens of chapters around the world fighting anti-Black racism. In January 2018 Patrisse Cullors published her memoir, When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. Her memoir became an instant New York Times bestseller.

     
  • Nov 28 Wed

    Free CeCe!

    6:00 PM

    Cup of Culture

    Film Screening / MCC Theater

    Free CeCe

    On her way to the store with a group of friends, Chrishaun Reed “CeCe” McDonald, a transgender Black woman, was brutally attacked. While defending her life, a man was killed. After a coercive interrogation, CeCe was incarcerated in a men’s prison in Minnesota. An international campaign to free CeCe garnered significant support from media and activists, including actress Laverne Cox. Cox signed on as executive producer of FREE CECE!, committed to exploring the role race, class, and gender played in CeCe’s case. A discussion will follow the film screening. 1h 41m.

     
  • Nov 29 Thu

    Speak Your Truths: An Evening of Self-Expression with William "MC Prototype" Bissic

    7:30 PM

    MCC in IV

    Open Mic / Biko Garage 6612 Sueno Rd, Isla Vista

    Speak Your Truths

    The MCC hosts a quarterly open mic for anyone to artistically express themselves using all creative outlets - including spoken word, poetry, music, and dance. This quarter’s MC will be William Bissic, aka MC Prototype. Though he’s been described as “Hip Hop’s breath of fresh air,” MC Prototype rarely chews gum. Having competed on two National Poetry Slam teams, performed at the world’s largest Independent Hip Hop Festival and taught workshops on writing, performing and music business, “Proto” is constantly looking for the next microphone to get in his hands, and the next way to build and educate his community through positive hip hop and poetry. As a host he is playful, as a poet he is captivating, and with any venture he, well, brings a healthy dose of that fresh air into the medium.

     
  • Nov 30 Fri

    Race and Literature

    6:00 PM

    Discussion / MCC Meeting Room

    This year, the MultiCultural Center is kicking off a new series to explore the issues of race and belonging through literature. This will be an interactive space for lively discussions on various theories about race, a safe space for articulating perspectives on identity and belonging which are contextualized by different authors, and an intentional time for centering the narratives of marginalized communities. Discussions will be facilitated by various faculty members, graduate students, and staff members. Readings may be suggested but are not required for attendance. This series hopes to cultivate open dialogue, and a spirit of appreciation and intellectual kinship. Dessert will be provided! All are welcome. Please contact the MCC if you’re interested in leading the conversation.